Time is a technology

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“There can be no silence up in the mountains, since their very contours roar. And for there to be silence, time itself has to attain a sort of horizontality; there has to be no echo of time in the future, but simply a sliding of geological strata one upon the other giving out nothing more than a fossil murmur.” America, Jean Baudrillard


About the work


A stone is dragged through the space using a hoist. The movement is so slow that it is hardly visible. The sound of the stone moving across grains of sand is picked up by microphones inside the stone and this sound is amplified through copper plates serving as loudspeakers. The extremely slow movement magnifies, as it were, each point of contact, making time tangible – or rather: audible – through the creaking and grating sounds. As the day progresses, the sound cumulates into an increasingly richer and fuller sound. At the end of the day, the sounds become a recording of the amount of energy necessary to move the stone. Like in his other works, the artist Gert Aertsen here reflects on the relationship between time and technology in our current information society. He tries to reverse this relationship and make it slow down rather than wanting to continue increasing its speed.

This piece was part of a State of stability, a collaboration with David De Buyser, from which it originated and was previously shown in exploratory setups using different materials. It was turned into an autonomous piece for the Sense of Sound exhibition at Z33. In case of the setup for the Sense of Sound Exhibition at Z33, it took about six hours to hoist the stone from one side of the room to the other. This coincided more or less with the opening hours of the exhibition. Each morning the stone had to be put back in place.

About Sense of Sound


Sound and movement are inextricably linked together. Movements and vibrations turn into audible sounds and back again. In 'Sense of Sound', sound manifests itself in many shapes and forms: vibrations, magnetic fields, electrical discharges or waves of feedback. But the various works have one thing in common: sounds can always be traced back to friction that makes the world move. From the resonance on your skull to your middle ear or from fluctuating voltage to a vibrating magnet. Sound is created when energy escapes and through air or materials transforms itself into a sensory sensation.
Sense of Sound is a cooperation between Z33 and Overtoon, a production facility in Brussels and a stage for sound and media art. All the works of art in the exhibition are new productions created by current or future Overtoon residents.
With works by Gert Aertsen, Christoph De Boeck, Aernoudt Jacobs, Stéfan Piat, Katerina Undo, Jeroen Uyttendaele and Jeroen Vandesande.

Image Gallery


All images are taken from the Sense of Sound exhibition in Hasselt which opened in march 2014. Courtesy to Kristof Vrancken

Timeisatech 00.jpg Timeisatech 01.jpg Timeisatech 02.jpg Timeisatech 03.jpg
Timeisatech 04.jpg Timeisatech 07.jpg Timeisatech 09.jpg Timeisatech 05.jpg
Timeisatech 06.jpg



Video


Footage of a previous exploratory setup which was shown within the context of a State of stability a collaboration with David Debuyser


Related


So it goes & 2m3

Code & technology

I'm using a discontinued magnetic rotary encoder v2.1 from makerbot. The arduino code for it i found here :
https://web.archive.org/web/20120105015729/http://wiki.makerbot.com/mre2


#define ENCODER_A_PIN 2
#define ENCODER_B_PIN 3
 
long position;
 
void setup()
{   
Serial.begin(19200);   
Serial.println("Started");    
pinMode(ENCODER_A_PIN, INPUT);   
pinMode(ENCODER_B_PIN, INPUT);    
attachInterrupt(0, read_quadrature, CHANGE);
} 
 
 
void loop()
{   
Serial.print("Position: ");   
Serial.println(position, DEC);   
delay(1000);
} 
 
 
 void read_quadrature()
{    
// found a low-to-high on channel A  
if (digitalRead(ENCODER_A_PIN) == HIGH)  
{      
// check channel B to see which way   
if (digitalRead(ENCODER_B_PIN) == LOW)       
position++;    
else       
position--;  
}  // found a high-to-low on channel A  
else                                          
{    
// check channel B to see which way    
if (digitalRead(ENCODER_B_PIN) == LOW)        
position--;    
else        
position++;  
}
}
Motor

AMETEK 38VDC 900 RPM MOTOR - 900 RPM AMETEK, #965922-101. Permanent magnet DC motor rated 38 VDC nominal. Reversible, ball bearing. Max. rated rpm is 1300 max. Armature current before permanent demagnetizationis 12 amps. Torque constant is 50 oz-in per amp. Terminal resistance 20ohms +-20%. Voltage constant is 37 VDC per 1000 rpm. When tested on 38 VDC, we recorded the following data: No-load spedd 1100 rpm @ 0.260 amp. With a 100 oz-in load the shaft speed was 900 rpm @ 2.3 amps. When tested as a generator at 1000 rpm, the output was 5.8 amps @ 12 VDC. Shaft: 5/8" dia. X 1-5/16" long. The opposite end of the shaft has a turned down diameter and a flat mounting area with two sets of tapped holes. This was probably originally intended for an encoder or tachometer mounting. This shaft has an outside dia. of 3/16" and is approx. 3/8" long. We do not have the encoders whtat were mounted on this motor, but suitable encoders are probably available from encoder suppliers if required. The motor has five #10x32 tpi tapped mounting holes on the shaft end of the motor body. Electrical connections are via 3-1/2" long flexible wires. Dimensions: 4" dia. X 4-1/2" long (excluding shafts). $74.50 Ea. MD548